Prince Harry’s Warning To Young Australians: “Selfies Are Bad!”

06262222c7dee86933a96838fc8d77e1Prince Harry reported for duty in the nation’s capital of Canberra to begin his four-week attachment to the Australian Army on Monday (6/4), braving the cold and rain to greet many admiring fans.

Chatting enthusiastically to fans, the British Royal was less generous with teenagers who wanted to photograph themselves with him. When asked to take a “selfie” by one admirer, the Prince laughed and said,

“No, I hate selfies. Seriously, you need to get out of it,” Ten Network television recorded him telling the admirer.

“I know you’re young, but selfies are bad,” Nine Network television recorded the prince saying.

The Prince warned against a self-obsessed generation and advised young people to get out of the habit and to “just take a normal photograph!” instead.

Much has been said about the Oxford Dictionary’s 2013 word of the year, “selfie”. It has become a word regularly used in everyday rhetoric, depicting the act of taking a self-portrait of yourself.

However, the seemingly harmless act of taking one’s picture has spiralled from being just a handy way of obtaining a photo to put as a profile picture to now becoming the stylized photograph of choice, giving way to a whole new world of narcissism and, at times, low self-worth.

In this article by Jezebel, the “selfie” has been described as “a cry for help”, a reflection of the way society teaches women that their most important quality is their physical attractiveness. A type of self-promotion that borders on obsessive, ostensibly with the intent of getting people to respond to them.

As stated in the article, “selfies aren’t expressions of pride, but rather calls for affirmation.”

Which begs us to question the reason behind this need for affirmation from youth and their peers. How does a self-portrait become the sole holder of one’s self-worth and esteem?

A report by UK’s The Daily Star revealed a study involving 2,071 men and women aged between 18 and 30 revealed that the majority of “selfie obsessed” individuals admit that behind their selfie perfect smiles is a low self-esteem.

The reasons why any of the subjects posted selfies ranged from capturing the moment when they look their best to communicating their mood instead of updating their profile status — but most common was to get attention from likes and comments.

The research, conducted by money-saving app VoucherCloud, showed that over half of young people take selfies at least once a week, with 73% of snaps going primarily toward social media — Instagram being the chief service.

When the regular selfie-takers were asked his they felt about their appearance and relationships, only a shocking 13% said they felt “confident in my own skin”, with 60% having “low self-esteem”.

The reasons why any of the subjects posted selfies ranged from capturing the moment when they look their best to communicating their mood instead of updating their profile status — but most common was to get attention from likes and comments.

Matthew Wood, MD of vouchercloud.com, said: “It seems as if the selfie trend is just growing more and more; this is a phenomenon which will be around for some time.

“What is important to remember is that a selfie is subject to lighting, Photoshop and a whole host of other factors”

Matthew Wood

“It is an increasingly popular way to share our lives and connect with friends and family and, dare I say it, the entire digital world.”

“Equally, for the selfie addicts, it is important to make sure that they don’t base all their self-esteem on a few comments or likes on a picture — there’s a lot more to a person than their selfie!”

 

 

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