The World’s 10 Worst Countries For Workers

arton16279-dab06The ITUC Global Rights Index 2015 has revealed that The Gulf States are among the world’s worst countries for workers’ rights.

The ITUC rights index ranks 141 countries against 97 internationally recognised indicators to assess where workers’ rights are best protected, in law and in practice.

“Workers in the Gulf States where the draconian ‘kafala’ system is widespread endure many of the violations which make the Middle East and North Africa the world’s worst region for fundamental rights at work,” said ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow.

“But in a worrying trend, European workers have witnessed the starkest deterioration of their rights in the last 12 months due to widespread government-imposed austerity measures taking effect.”

The ten worst countries for working people are Belarus, China, Colombia, Egypt, Guatemala, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland and United Arab Emirates.

Other countries ranked lower but had worsening conditions this year in a clear negative trend for workers. These nations were Burundi, Dominican Republic, Hong Kong, Iran, Georgia, Russia, United Kingdom and Spain.

“Workers in Colombia and Guatemala have been murdered for trying to negotiate better working conditions, while in Qatar and Saudi Arabia migrants continue to endure forced labour and labour law exclusions which amount to modern slavery.

“In 73 of 141 countries, workers faced dismissals, suspensions, pay cuts and demotions for attempting to negotiate better working conditions, while in 84 countries employers adopted illegal strategies to deny or delay bargaining with representative trade unions.

“While a handful of countries have attained perfect scores compared to last year, there’s been an increase across the board in the number of countries where conditions have worsened, including nations such as Cameroon, Hungary, Spain and South Africa,” Ms Burrow said.

The reports key findings include:

  • Out of a total of 141 countries, the number where workers faced arbitrary arrest and detention increased from 35 to 44, and included countries such as Spain and Brazil.
  • In almost 60 per cent of countries, certain types of workers are excluded from their fundamental labour rights.
  • Unionists were murdered in 11 countries, one up from last year, including 22 deaths in Colombia alone.
  • Seventy per cent of countries have workers with no right to strike.
  • Two thirds of countries deny workers collective bargaining rights.
  • More than half of countries in the survey deny workers access to the rule of law.

The report has also revealed that Australian workers’ living standards are failing and that our nation has been ranked as a ‘regular violator of rights’, of which we share with 36 other countries including Israel.

 

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